A Question I Was Asked:

'Can You Offer Any Really Good Illustrations of the Trinity?'


My Reply:

Well, while all such analogies necessarily fall short, in my new article on the Holy Trinity I offer this:

'...A better analogy might be to say that while I am one man of one substance, yet - within myself - I have three "persons" of 1. Intellect, 2. Emotions, and 3. Conscience. There is a sense in which my emotions 'speak to me' as does my conscience, so there is a certain 'separateness' and yet none of those things can ever be wholly separated from myself. The similarity could be taken even further: a friend could say, "I met Robin today and he gave me a message; the message was certainly from his conscience." Another friend might say, "Robin e mailed me but his emotions were speaking!" Jesus was able to pray to the Father, modalism could never make sense of that, but in my example I could say that my conscience "pleaded" with my intellect, or will, for the means/logistics/intellectual back-up to take a certain decent path or route. Like all such analogies this falls well short of the actual Holy Trinity, but this has better shape to it than modalism.'

Obviously that too falls short but it has a better shape than those analogies which are really examples of 'modalism.' This example stresses that a man is of 'one substance' but has these 'inner parts' of things like conscience, intellect and emotions all of which - in a sense - have separate 'voices' yet none of which can ever be separated from the individual. Jesus was able to pray to the Father, modalism could never make sense of that, but in my example I could say that my conscience "pleaded" with my intellect, or will, for the means/logistics/intellectual back-up to take a certain decent path or route. Do you want a good explanation of what 'modalism' is? Go to my full article (link below).
I hope that these few comments help.
Robin A. Brace, 2007.

My new consideration of the Holy Trinity is here.
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